Half Marathon Training Plan After Age 40

Because you have run in several shorter races, you’re ready to run in a half marathon. At this point, you know what you need to do. So, lets get started.

Half Marathon Training at Age 40

Since you’re over 40, you want to run at a slower pace to begin. If you’re new to running, you have to realize it takes your body and mind time to adjust. But with trying anything new, you can accomplish anything you set out to do.

Ultimately, it is important to make sure you have a healthy heart and lungs before you start training. At this point, you have successfully competed in short races.

Half Marathon Training – Beginner

Before beginning training for a half marathon, you want to make sure you can run for at least 30 to 40 minutes without stopping. Additionally, before running in a half marathon, make sure you have run in many shorter races.

In the same way, it is important to know what level you are comfortable at. If you’re a beginner, make sure you pace yourself. Indeed, you don’t want to run too fast in which you become exhausted easily. By setting a pace you’re comfortable with, you will be better prepared.

A beginner should alternate between walking and running. For example, start running 20 – 30 minutes, slow down to a brisk walk, then start running again at a slower pace. By getting comfortable, you will be better prepared to not risk any injury and be able to accomplish your goal.

Half Marathon Training – Intermediate

Of course, if you’re a serious runner, you may have less work to do. An intermediate runner can opt for a faster pace and longer time periods.

Hence, an intermediate runner can run 5-6 days a week, without incurring any type of health issue. Also, an intermediate runner has competed successfully in dozens of shorter races.

Half Marathon Training – Advance

If you’re a seasoned pro at running, you’re able to run at least 40 minutes without stopping. Moreover, you have run at least 10 miles a few times a week.

Conclusion

To sum up, it is best you master running at a pace and speed you’re comfortable with. No matter what level you’re at as a runner, it is important to accomplish running on various surface levels. Make sure you practice running on flat and uneven roads so you will be better prepared to handle the road on the day of the half marathon.

As always, I welcome your comments.

By |2017-08-29T06:23:57+00:00August 22nd, 2017|Health, Lifestyle|2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Rosemary Pellegrini August 31, 2017 at 2:25 pm - Reply

    I ran my first 5K at 50 and a 10k at 51 I thought I would stop at that but your article has motivated me to go for the half marathon. I was never a runner before but had always worked out I like your suggestion on pacing and mixing walking with running time won’t matter to me it’s the satisfaction of completing a goal.

    • Lynne Black August 31, 2017 at 3:39 pm - Reply

      Congratulations on running both the 5k and 10k. A half marathon requires a lot of training. Also continue to participate in shorter runs before participating in a half marathon. I think it is more important to complete the race, than making good running time. Good luck with your training for a future half marathon.

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